The effects of exercise on mental illness

The effects of exercise on mental illness

The video looks at how exercise affects mental health, specifically for the adult and elderly populations. An exercise physiologist, who is a part of the Stay Well program at St. Josephs’s Hospital, was interviewed to share his expertise on the benefits of exercise.

This video was made by McMaster Demystifying Medicine students Ava Oliaei, Nour Eddin Garada and Nadia Butt.

Copyright McMaster University 2019

https://suicideprevention.ca/need-help/

Kids Help Phone: 1-800-668-6868

Hope for Wellness Help Line: 1-855-242-3310

Canada Mental Health Association crisis line: 1-833-456-4566

If you’re thinking about suicide, are worried about a friend or loved on, the Canada Suicide Prevention Service is available 24/7 for voice support.

References

Chekroud, S. R., Gueorguieva, R., Zheutlin, A. B., Paulus, M., Krumholz, H. M., Krystal, J. H., & Chekroud, A. M. (2018). Association between physical exercise and mental health in 1·2 million individuals in the USA between 2011 and 2015: a cross-sectional study. The Lancet Psychiatry, 5(9), 739–746. doi: 10.1016/s2215-0366(18)30227-x

Craft, L. L., & Landers, D. M. (1998). The Effect of Exercise on Clinical Depression and Depression Resulting from Mental Illness: A Meta-Analysis. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 20(4), 339–357. doi: 10.1123/jsep.20.4.339

Harvard Health Publishing. (n.d.). More evidence that exercise can boost mood. Retrieved from https://www.health.harvard.edu/mind-and-mood/more-evidence-that-exercise-can-boost-mood.

Lavie, C. J., Arena, R., Swift, D. L., Johannsen, N. M., Sui, X., Lee, D.-C., … Blair, S. N. (2015). Exercise and the Cardiovascular System. Circulation Research, 117(2), 207–219. doi: 10.1161/circresaha.117.305205

Malchow, B., Reich-Erkelenz, D., Oertel-Knöchel, V., Keller, K., Hasan, A., Schmitt, A., … Falkai, P. (2013). The effects of physical exercise in schizophrenia and affective disorders. European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience, 263(6), 451–467. doi: 10.1007/s00406-013-0423-2

Radak, Z., Hart, N., Sarga, L., Koltai, E., Atalay, M., Ohno, H., & Boldogh, I. (2010). Exercise Plays a Preventive Role Against Alzheimers Disease. Journal of Alzheimers Disease, 20(3), 777–783. doi: 10.3233/jad-2010-091531

Sharma, A., Madaan, V., & Petty, F. D. (2006). Exercise for Mental Health. The Primary Care Companion to The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 08(02), 106. doi: 10.4088/pcc.v08n0208

How Does Exercise Impact Weight Loss?

How Does Exercise Impact Weight Loss?

Developed and produced by http://www.MechanismsinMedicine.com
Animation description: In this animation, we discuss the concept of physical activity and exercise as they relate to obesity.
In humans there is a fine balance between energy intake and energy expenditure.
Energy intake is in the form of food, and energy expenditure is in the form of the basal metabolic rate and physical activity.
The difference between energy intake and energy expenditure is the net energy balance. If intake exceeds expenditure, then a net positive energy balance occurs.
Energy expenditure depends on a number of factors.
This includes the starting body weight, the basal metabolic rate and physical activity.
With regards to physical activity, there are several key variables including the frequency, intensity, duration and type of activity done.
Let us now examine energy consumption. One honey glazed donut is shown which has approximately 300 kilocalories.
The energy intake from the consumed donut is equal to the energy consumed by moderate walking for 30-60 minutes, at 3.0 miles per hour.
If an individual walks for an hour at 3 miles per hour.
They will expend approximately 300 kilocalories, the same as what was contained in the consumed donut.
If an individual walks daily for one hour at approximately 3 miles per hour. This type of activity would lead to weight loss. This assumes that the individual does not consume any extra calories and has a net negative energy expenditure.
If this activity continues for a period of two to four months, body weight is reduced as depicted.
The initial weight loss is the result of a negative net energy balance.
The negative energy balance is because energy expenditure exceeds energy intake.
After the initial weight loss, the individual continues to do the same type of exercise, that is, 1 hour of moderate walking daily.
The chart depicts changes in body weight over time.
Individuals are surprised and frustrated that his weight is not continuing to decrease despite regular walking.
They have reached a plateau.
The reason behind the weight loss pleateau is that with decreased body weight, the basal metabolic rate also decreases.
When the basal metabolic rate decreases, there is a decrease in total energy expenditure.
If the discouraged individual quits his daily walking exercise. The weight is gained again, at a quicker pace.
The weight is re-gained as a result of a positive energy balance being created.
Energy expenditure is now less since the physical activity has been stopped.
By keeping the same intensity and duration of walking without making any changes in the diet (energy intake) the man would enter a weight maintenance phase.
This is characterised by gaining a small amount of weight.
The weight maintenance is the result of an energy balance being established within the body, where energy intake essentially equals energy expenditure.
If there is no change in energy balance, there will not be any further change in weight.
What must be done to end the weight loss plateau?
Several options exist to maintain a negative net energy balance. These involve either decreasing energy intake or increasing energy expenditure.
Options include: restricting calories further or increasing the frequency, or the intensity or the duration of the exercise.
In summary then, weight loss plateau’s are expected and can only end with continued exercise and a net negative energy balance.
Stopping exercise or increasing calories will lead to weight gain.
If one continues to exercise to maintain a net negative energy balance weight loss will be promoted.

How to cope with anxiety | Olivia Remes | TEDxUHasselt

How to cope with anxiety | Olivia Remes | TEDxUHasselt

Anxiety is one of most prevalent mental health disorders, with 1 out of 14 people around the world being likely affected. Leading up to conditions such as depression, increased risk for suicide, disability and requirement of high health services, very few people who often need treatment actually receive it. In her talk “How to cope with anxiety”, Olivia Remes of the University of Cambridge will share her vision on anxiety and will unravel ways to treat and manage this health disorder. Arguing that treatments such as psychotherapy and medication exist and often result in poor outcome and high rates of relapses, she will emphasise the importance of harnessing strength in ourselves as we modify our problem-coping mechanisms. Olivia will stress that by allowing ourselves to believe that what happens in life is comprehensive, meaningful, and manageable, one can significantly improve their risk of developing anxiety disorders.

Anxiety is one of most prevalent mental health disorders, with 1 out of 14 people around the world being likely affected. Leading up to conditions such as depression, increased risk for suicide, disability and requirement of high health services, very few people who often need treatment actually receive it. In her talk “How to cope with anxiety”, Olivia Remes of the University of Cambridge will share her vision on anxiety and will unravel ways to treat and manage this health disorder. Arguing that treatments such as psychotherapy and medication exist and often result in poor outcome and high rates of relapses, she will emphasise the importance of harnessing strength in ourselves as we modify our problem-coping mechanisms. At TEDxUHasselt 2017, Olivia will stress that by allowing ourselves to believe that what happens in life is comprehensive, meaningful, and manageable, one can significantly improve their risk of developing anxiety disorders.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

Is it possible to just start running? How to master your Marathon Technique

Is it possible to just start running? How to master your Marathon Technique

Can we really go from couch to 5K while staying healthy? How do you know if you are ready to run?
Join us in our brand new 3 part series featuring TV presenter Jenni Falconer as she shares the latest tips and strategies on running and exercise speaking with our leading HCA Healthcare UK consutants.

In part 1 join us as Jenni Falconer visits The ISEH – Institute of Sport, Exercise and Health to find out how you can improve your performance when it comes to running and exercise. #readytorun #LondonMarathon

Here’s some episodes you may have missed:

Episode 2 : https://bit.ly/2GHORzb

Episode 3 : https://bit.ly/2vp4pTi

Bonus Tips for taking up running : https://bit.ly/2GPoIzD

You can also learn more about running injuries and how you can avoid them at : https://bit.ly/2W84feP

Get in touch today:

Subscribe on Youtube : http://ow.ly/NoDX30nBpe0
Join us on Facebook : https://bit.ly/2ZFfeib
Follow on Twitter: https://bit.ly/2Vkz2YP
Connect with us on Linkedin: https://bit.ly/2DDko4O

Mental Health Statistics in America (US) (Statistics, Facts, and Data)

Mental Health Statistics in America (US) (Statistics, Facts, and Data)

Mental Health Statistics in America (US) (Statistics, Facts, and Data) – Learn more: https://healthery.com/

Mental Health Statistics in America (Statistics, Facts, and Data): Presented by
Did you know: 1 in 5 adults, in the US, have a mental health condition. The mental health of the youth, in the US, is worsening. 76% of today’s youth do not obtain enough treatment or care. 56% of American adults do not obtain treatment and lack access to care. The ratio of individuals per professionals, in the US, is 6:1. Alabama has only 1 mental health professional per 1,260 individuals.

Youth with severe depression has increased from 5.9 to 8.2% in 5 years. About 1 in every 25 adults have a serious mental illness in the US. 18.1% of adults in the US experienced an anxiety disorder in 1 year. According to the CDC, suicide is the 10th cause of death in the US. 1 in 100, or 1.1%, of American adults have schizophrenia. 6.1 million American adults have bi-polar disorder, that’s 2.6%. 16 million Americans adults or 6.9% have major depression. Roughly 10 million adults have co-occurring mental health & addiction disorders. 24% of state prisoners had a recent mental health condition. 90% of the people who died from suicide had a mental health illness. The leading cause of disability, in the world, is depression.

Half of all chronic mental illnesses start by age 14 and third by age 24. 11% of American youth have a mood disorder and 8% have an anxiety disorder. Suicide for youth ages: 10-24 is the 3rd leading cause of death. Youth ages 14 and up have a school dropout rate of 37%.

What can we do to help?

1. Talk with your doctor or healthcare professional.
2. Get a mental health specialist referral.
3. Reach out to friends and family or join a support group.
4. Be active and try social activities.
5. Care for a pet or make an adoption.
6. Ask a loved one to check on you regularly.
7. Don’t forget to eat healthy and exercise.
8. Confide in a clergy member, teacher, or sports coach.

Finally, if you or anyone is ever in any kind of danger call 911 immediately.

Website: https://healthery.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/healthery
Twitter: https://twitter.com/MyHealthery

IL-6 Targeting

IL-6 Targeting

This webcast reviews current data, safety issues, and novel approaches to IL-6 inhibition. Visit http://www.ccfcme.org/biovcmevideos to claim CME credit or learn more about the Biologic Therapies V series.

The IL-6 targeting webcast features expert faculty member, Arthur Kavanaugh, MD, of University of California, San Diego.

The video was produced by the Cleveland Clinic Foundation Center for Continuing Education and RJ Fasenmyer Center for Clinical Immunology.

Interested in related CME education? Visit http://www.ccfcme.org/rheumcme

Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMEClevelandClinic
Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/cleveclinic_cme

Exercise is Medicine®: The Importance of Connecting Fitness with Healthcare

Exercise is Medicine®: The Importance of Connecting Fitness with Healthcare

The Larry Golding Keynote Exercise is Medicine®: The Importance of Connecting Fitness with Healthcare, at the 2017 ACSM Health & Fitness Summit was presented by Robert E. Sallis, M.D., Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, CA.
The broad ranging health benefits of regular physical activity cannot be denied and it is clear that exercise is a powerful medicine that should be prescribed by healthcare providers to all their patients. To help make this happen, a Physical Activity Vital Sign (PAVS) should be used in all patient encounters and fitness professionals should become part of the healthcare team to design exercise regimens for patients. This lecture outlines a plan to make this an actionable reality – after all, Exercise is Medicine (EIM).

Recording Courtesy of ACSM Health & Fitness Summit