Mitochondria control of physiology and disease: beyond ATP

Mitochondria control of physiology and disease: beyond ATP

Mitochondria control of physiology and disease: beyond ATP

Air date: Wednesday, March 7, 2018, 3:00:00 PM

Category: WALS – Wednesday Afternoon Lectures

Runtime: 00:57:53

Description: NIH Director’s Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series

Historically, mitochondria have been primarily viewed as biosynthetic and bioenergetic organelles that generate metabolites for the production of macromolecules and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), respectively. The work of the Chandel laboratory has elucidated that mitochondria have a third distinct role whereby they release reactive oxygen species (ROS) and metabolites to regulate transcription factors and epigenetics. For his lecture, Dr. Chandel will present his lab’s ongoing efforts to understand how mitochondria, in addition to producing ATP, regulate cancer and immunity.

For more information go to https://oir.nih.gov/wals/2017-2018

Author: Navdeep S. Chandel, Ph.D., David W. Cugell Professor of Medicine, Northwestern University

Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?23744

Dr. Stephen Phinney: Is a ketogenic diet safe for your heart?

Dr. Stephen Phinney: Is a ketogenic diet safe for your heart?

Stephen Phinney, MD, Ph.D and Amy McKenzie, Ph.D discuss low carbohydrate nutrition research in a Facebook Live on March 8, 2018.

Learn more at https://www.virtahealth.com/
Read more by Dr. Stephen Phinney at: https://blog.virtahealth.com/author/s…

Stephen Phinney, MD, Ph.D and Amy McKenzie, Ph.D, are scientists and researchers as well as collaborators on a recent clinical trial examining a technology-supported and medically-supervised ketogenic intervention. 

Stephen Phinney, MD, Ph.D is the Chief Medical Officer and Co-Founder of Virta Health, the first clinically-proven treatment to safely and sustainably reverse type 2 diabetes without medications or surgery. Amy McKenzie, Ph.D is a senior research scientist at Virta Health.

Exercise intensity perceptions in active people – Video abstract [ID 63496]

Exercise intensity perceptions in active people – Video abstract [ID 63496]

Video abstract of an original research paper “People who perceive themselves as active cannot identify the intensity recommended by the international physical activity guidelines” published in the Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine by Prokop, Hrubeniuk, Sénéchal, et al.

Background: Many national and international organizations recommend that adults achieve at least 150 minutes of aerobic physical activity (PA) weekly, at a minimum moderate intensity to optimize health benefits. It is unknown if people who consider themselves as active have the ability to identify what is considered moderate intensity.

Methods: Fifty-one participants who reported achieving a minimum 150 minutes per week at a minimum of moderate intensity PA were recruited through a local fitness facility. All participants underwent a single assessment involving questionnaires, clinical measures, and a treadmill test to measure the ability to perceive moderate intensity. Following the visit, participants’ PA level was evaluated by heart rate monitor, while exercising, for 7 consecutive days.

Results: Eighty percent of participants overestimated moderate intensity on the treadmill test; they were at vigorous intensity compared to what is considered moderate. Only 11.8% of participants accurately identified moderate intensity; all of them were women (P=0.03), had a high level of education (P=0.04), and knew that moderate intensity was the minimum intensity recommended by health organizations (P,0.01). Only 69.2% of participants reached the aerobic component of the International Physical Activity Guidelines with no significant advantage for those correctly identifying moderate intensity.

Conclusion: Most people who perceive themselves as active are exercising at vigorous intensity while believing they are at moderate intensity. In addition, in this active sample, one-third of the participants were not reaching the aerobic component of the International Physical Activity Guidelines.

Read the original research paper here: http://www.dovepress.com/people-who-perceive-themselves-as-active-cannot-identify-the-intensity-peer-reviewed-article-OAJSM

Should Cancer Patients Take Vitamins and Supplements? | Dana-Farber Cancer Institute?

Should Cancer Patients Take Vitamins and Supplements? | Dana-Farber Cancer Institute?

Should vitamins and supplements be a part of a cancer patient’s diet? Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center Nutritionist Stacy Kennedy, MPH, RD, CSO, discusses the best foods and diet for cancer patients.

This video was originally filmed as part of a live video webchat, “The Best Foods and Diet for Cancer Treatment and Survivorship,” held on March 25, 2015. View the entire webchat here: https://youtu.be/w-92_tZr_B0

More information on nutrition during cancer treatment is available at: http://www.dana-farber.org/nutrition

Transcription:

You really want to go back to your dietician and to your doctor with any of these questions, because certain supplements are important and helpful. Some people need to take Vitamin D. Some people need to take probiotics. Magnesium sometimes, if your blood level is low from chemo.

But there are other supplements that can actually reduce the effectiveness of your treatment. For example, taking high-dose antioxidant pills during radiation therapy may reduce its effectiveness—same thing for chemo. So, you don’t want to be going through all of this and doing something that’s inadvertently sort of compromising its success to some extent.

One thing that people often are understandably confused about is, ‘Well, then I guess I shouldn’t eat blueberries, because those have antioxidants.’ And the issue and concern is just with supplements, which can be high dose, potent, and also to some extent a lack of regulation, so we don’t want you skipping those fruits and veggies. We want you picking those and asking your doctor about the supplements. Don’t just start taking vitamins thinking they’re going to fill in the gaps.

3002 – Food for Thought – Walter Veith

3002 – Food for Thought – Walter Veith

There are many risk factors that affect our health. If we look at the studies behind the common health concerns we will notice how lifestyle diseases are at the top of every list.

In this knowledge-filled lecture with Walter Veith we will look at the importance of diet. What is the food that is perfect for a healthy brain? The brain consumes glucose for energy. How do we keep our glucose levels high healthfully to maintain a healthy mind? What are the key fruits and vegetables that contribute to healthy brains?